SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
UNIVERSITY OF HAWAIʻI AT MĀNOA

June 30, 2016

Professor David Rockwood published in Sustainable Cities and Society

Image Exterior 3D rendering - THANH HA 10KT

David Rockwood

Professor

Professor David Rockwood, with co-author Tran Duc Quang of Danang University of Science and Technology have had their paper, “Urban immigrant worker housing research and design for Danang, Viet Nam” published in the Elsevier journal Sustainable Cities and Society 26 (2016) 108-118.

June 29, 2016

Architecture is key for future Mars exploration

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Tristan Bassingthwaighte

DArch candidate and HI-SEAS IV crewmember (Hawai‘i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation)

No one ever said space exploration would be comfortable.

Inhospitable environments, deadly atmospheres, the possibility of storms and other natural outer space disasters—how will humans be able to both survive and thrive on places like Mars? One answer, is architecture.

“Our entire lives, on other worlds, are going to be contained within the buildings we make while we’re there or bring with us,” explains Tristan Bassingthwaighte, a crewmember on a year-long, HI-SEAS Mars simulation mission on the island of Hawaiʻi. The NASA-funded mission is run by the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, where Bassingthwaighte is also a graduate student studying architecture for extreme environments.

The harsh conditions on the lava fields that flank Mauna Loa—with the exception of the human-friendly atmosphere—are not so different than Mars, which is home to the largest volcano in our solar system.

“So I’m doing my doctorate while I’m up here, living in fields of lava while trying to design structures for other people to live in other fields of lava someday,” says Bassingthwaighte.

But what form those structures should take remains to be seen.

“Underground, in a dome, in a printed ice dome, in a 3D printed structure, in a tin can,” he explains. “If you’re going to go there for two weeks to try and explore, you’re probably going to have a little mothership up above with maybe one or two inflatable modules and a little tin can lander on the ground.”


A longer stay would require different designs.

“You’re going to want a lot more space and capability, and so you’ll probably be either building structures on the ground or building an inflatable module and hiding in a cave or covering it with regolith, just to protect yourself from the radiation,” adds Bassingthwaighte. “You want to be able to include nature, you want to have the room to move, spaces that don’t feel like they’re confining you all the time.”

The HI-SEAS mission has allowed Bassingthwaighte an extraordinary opportunity to take his classroom learning at UH Mānoa into the field.

“It’s very, very cool to be able to have studied extreme architecture, to have begun designing things for buildings on the moon, or Mars or the Antarctic, and then actually get to come here to live in this same environment that I would if I were building these things for real,” he says. “That’s super awesome.”

Link to video:
http://www.kitv.com/story/32450663/uh-student-taking-part-in-big-island-mars-simulation

Link to article:
http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2016/09/07/lessons-learned-from-a-year-on-simulated-mars/

Additional links:
Hawai‘i Public Radio, Sep 12, 2016:  what is was like being in a Mars simulated habitat for a year
http://hawaiipublicradio.org/post/bytemarks-caf-hi-seas-mars-simulation-crew

Hawai‘i Public Radio, Sep 6, 2016:  Life on Mars?
http://hawaiipublicradio.org/post/conversation-tuesday-september-6th-2016

Hawai‘i News Now, Sep 6, 2016
http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/33030962/global-media-document-historic-university-of-hawaii-mars-simulation

WeMartians Podcast:  Mission to sMars
https://soundcloud.com/wemartians

June 25, 2016

Architecture undergraduates win award in Shanghai

Chloe Bennie prepares to welcome inquisitive children into the Grassroots House (photo by Jerry Yin)

Hongtao Zhou

Assistant Professor

A team of undergraduates in the University of Hawaiʻ at Mānoa School of Architecture won an award in the 2016 Tongji International Construction Festival’s 10th Feng Yu Zhu Cup Design and Construction Competition in Shanghai, China.

The UH project, “Grassroots House,” ranked number six in the first round of jury voting and ultimately received a third prize award in the final round. The entry was also named “most popular with children,” according to the Shanghai media.

The team members are undergraduate students Chloe Bennie, Jannah Dela Cruz, Janica Domingo, Angus Lin and Richard Robinson, instructed by Assistant Professor Hongtao Zhou.

The project was designed to use PVC cardboard’s one directional bending and semi-translucent property to create the largest panel-bending structure in the competition. The wall design took advantage of the horizontal “fiber” strength for bending, and the roof panels rotated their grain direction to a vertical position in order to form an internal dome and expressive grass roof to guide rain water downward.

Three individual spaces with varying floor heights formed a small neighborhood inside for users to connect and interact. The creativity of the expressive roof was also functional, as the project survived a heavy rain in Shanghai while about 85% of other schools’ projects collapsed during the downpour.

An international experience

Almost 60 teams and more than 500 architecture students and faculty from around the world were invited to compete in the four-day design and construction challenge in Shanghai. Other participating schools included McGill University (Canada), Bauhaus University (Germany), National School of Architecture of Versailles (France), Polytechnic University of Catalonia (Spain), Pusan National University (Korea), Graz University of Technology (Austria), and China’s top architecture schools, design schools and art schools.

This year marked the decade-long anniversary of the festival, with a theme of Micro Community. Students were asked to use a new material, polypropylene hollow sheet, and 300 PVC bolts to create an architectural pavilion of 8 square meters to provide creative living space considering creativity, spatial quality, durability and resistance to weather. They are asked to complete design, testing, prefabrication and onsite construction, and also to sleep inside of the pavilion overnight during Shanghai’s rainy season.

After four days and nights of intense design and fabrication workshops with their instructors, about 55 teams completed their projects on time in Tongji University Architecture Square. 

Architecture undergraduates at award ceremony, with Assistant Professor Hongtao Zhou, at right (photo by Juncheng Shen)

May 11, 2016

The 2016 Sustainable Versatility Student Architect Design Awards Announced

Image After reimagining _1

Joo-Hyun Park

DArch Candidate

Second Place Winner, 2016 Sustainable Versatility Design Competition

The 2016 Sustainable Versatility Design Competition marks the (NELMA) Northeastern Lumber Manufacturers Association’s 5th year of offering this unique architecture and design student challenge that engages students in a design dialogue about sustainability, design culture and tradition through the use of wood products as a contemporary construction and design material, focusing on Eastern White Pine.

The 2016 Design Challenge: “Choose an iconic building in your community or school and 're-imagine' how that structure would showcase Eastern White Pine. Get creative and show us how Eastern White Pine products could be used to make a great space even greater (and greener)!”

JooHyun Park’s entry, “Four Wooden Box,” uniquely showcased the use of Eastern White Pine in re-imagined design, of how wood can transform a structure in an appealing way.  He received a $500 second-place winning and a unique trophy constructed of Eastern White Pine. 

JooHyun credits his work from the advice he received from Professors David Rockwood and Martin Despang.

May 13, 2016

Sara Jensen Carr named 2016-2017 Dumbarton Oaks Fellow

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Sara Jensen Carr

Assistant Professor

Assistant Professor Sara Jensen Carr has been named a 2016-2017 Mellon Fellow in Urban Landscape Studies at the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection in Washington, DC. Dumbarton Oaks is an institute of Harvard University dedicated to supporting scholarship internationally in Byzantine, Garden and Landscape, and Pre-Columbian studies through fellowships, meetings, exhibitions, and publications. The Mellon Fellowships are given to both humanities scholars and landscape practitioners, building constructive dialogue between them about the history and future of urban landscapes, and encouraging them to bridge the gap between their professional modes of thinking. Dr. Carr will be in residency at Dumbarton Oaks in the Spring of 2017 to research and write her book, The Topography of Wellness: Health and the American Urban Landscape, which is currently under contract with University of Virginia Press.

May 4, 2016

Invited to Participate in Harvard GSD Colloquium

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Wendy Meguro

Assistant Professor

Wendy Meguro is part of a distinguished body of external reviewers and experts invited to participate in the Colloquium of final research projects presented by Master of Design Studies degree candidates in the Energy & Environments Concentration at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.  “The Energy and Environments concentration focuses on buildings and landscapes as both small and large-scale thermodynamic systems that aim to maximize energy intake, use, and feedback, achieving broad design and ecological impacts.”

 

Wendy Meguro, LEED AP
Assistant Professor of Sustainable Building & Community Design
School of Architecture
Sea Grant College Program
University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/#/academic-programs/master-in-design-studies/energy-and-environments/index.html

April 28, 2016

do.co.mo.mo Talk Story with Assistant Professor Lance Walters "Breeze-Blocks: Don't call it a Comeback"

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Lance Walters

Associate Professor

Please join us for a talk story with Assistant Professor Lance Walters. Lance will discuss the highly functional and aesthetic breeze-blocks used in construction today as they are considered a direct and uninterrupted link to the mid-century architectural movement that popularized them over 60 years ago. Whether in Hawaii, Los Angeles, Miami or Madrid, the commonalities shared in production, material and utility have all contributed to the success and neglect of this uniquely brand-less design element. However, despite that legacy and their superficial uniformity, breeze-blocks carry deep-rooted regional nuances and local taxonomy, some of which the UHM architectural students began to explore in Lance's second year design studio. A display of his students' work can also be found in the Architecture School lobby.

April 17, 2016

Three UHM Students Win Awards in the Lyceum Fellowship Competition

Joern Vallesteros:  First Prize

Joern Vallesteros, Michael Honyak, Jayna McClaran

Candidates, Doctor of Architecture

The Lyceum Fellowship competition welcomed submissions from students attending an accredited school of architecture in North America.  The 2016 Lyceum Competition was inspired by the proposal that Boston be the host city for the 2024 Summer Olympic Games.  While with certainty, the Olympics will not be hosted in Boston, student competitors were instructed to approach this design problem using Boston as the hypothetical host city.  This competition premise was to explore urban, architectural and landscape issues highlighting Boston’s urban qualities and incorporating its existing infrastructure, its long-term vision, and its values.

Students’ individual works were performed in studio under the direction of Professor Clark Llewellyn, FAIA.

The purpose of Lyceum travel award prizes is to enrich a student’s academic experience subsequent to travel expenses.  Three DArch students received high honors in this year’s competition:

First prize:  Joern Vallesteros ($12,000 for 4 months travel abroad)
Second prize:  Michael Honyak ($7,500 for 2 months travel abroad)
Citation (First Alternate) was awarded to Jayna McClaran

 

Work below in the same order as listed winners:





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