SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
UNIVERSITY OF HAWAIʻI AT MĀNOA

September 13, 2017

DArch Projects on ScholarSpace

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Hyoung-June Park

Director of Graduate Programs

ScholarSpace at the University of Hawaii is an open-access, digital resource for intellectual research and publications.  This Digital Institutional Repository has the collection of doctoral projects from the UH Manoa School of Architecture, currently from 2007-2016.  There are 260 theses available to discover through the author's name, subject/key terms, and year.  Additionally, each one contains the document for view/download, faculty advisor's name, and full abstract.  This academic resource will allow for a permanent "hard url" to share publicly and add to webpages. ScholarSpace will continue to be updated. 

Design Futures Laboratory developed the project as a part of its continuous efforts for establishing the intellectual repository and resilient interface for our future. The lab is directed by Professor Emeritus Raymond Yeh and Associate Professor Hyoung-June Park. As one of research assistants at the lab, Julia Schray, first year D.Arch. candidate, played a key role in this project with her volition "as accessibility to academia can provide knowledge for those interested in progressive architectural theory and application". 

https://scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10125/45358?subject_page=0

August 24, 2017

D.Arch. Project Receives the 2017 APA Hawaii Annual Chapter Award

Ka Mala Lani: Re-Planning School Grounds for Growing Pono

Alberto Ricordi

D. Arch., ASLA Associate, SITES AP; Landscape Designer at PBR Hawaii & Associates, Inc..

Alberto Ricordi (D.Arch. '15), Blanche Pope Elementary School, and the UHM School of Architecture were selected as recipients of the 2017 APA Hawaii Chapter Student Project, for the D.Arch. project "Ka Mala Lani: Re-Planning School Grounds for Growing Pono". In his D.Arch. dissertation, Ricordi developed a participatory design method based on the school garden “Ka Mala Lani” concepts of “growing pono” (in righteousness) and pu'uhonua (place of refuge). The school’s largely Native Hawaiian student population often struggles in passive academic settings, but is able to find refuge and healing in the “Ka Mala Lani” garden.  His master plan, consisting of a site plan and design solutions for Blanche Pope Elementary School, addresses not only environmental and resource management issues, but also social and educational goals for the school’s students. The school has successfully used the master plan as a tool to form community partnerships to implement three major projects, of which Ricordi has been an integral part of: a rain garden, led by Hui o Ko'olau Poko; a lilikoi hale and school garden improvements, through a Green Apple Day of Service event led by HHF Planners and USGBC Hawaii; and the “Garden of Eden” wellness pathway, led by PBR Hawaii and funded by Kaulunani Urban and Forestry Program. These projects and the master plan have been used by teachers to fulfill STEM curriculum standards and have the potential to strengthen community empowerment, identity, and self-sufficiency, bringing a UH SoA doctoral project from vision to reality for the benefit of local community.

DARCH and Community Projects PDF

August 1, 2017

Ratios from the Intersections of 10 + 1 Proportionalities

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Hyoung-June Park, Ph.D.

Nexus Network Journal, April 2017, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 145–154

His paper titled “Ratios from the Intersections of 10 + 1 Proportionalities” was published in Nexus Network Journal, April 2017, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 145–154. The following is its abstract excerpted from Springer website (https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00004-016-0328-2)

“An innovative mathematical analysis comparing sets of preferred ratios from authors from antiquity (Vitruvius), the Renaissance (Alberti, Serlio and Palladio), and the modern age (Fechner and Lalo) with the eleven unique and universal proportionalities sheds new light on architects’ use of certain ratios to endow their creations with commensurability and beauty. Some ratios may provide more ways of representing three magnitudes, and this might provide a clue to their enduring appearance in architectural works.”




(Projected graph to show ratios from the intersections of 10 + 1 proportionalities)

April 1, 2017

Design Exchange: Peace Memorial

Image Arch-490_Peace-Memorial1GroupAtNID

Karla Sierralta

Assistant Professor

Assistant Professor Karla Sierralta, together with her students: Calvin Bulan, Jason Hashimoto, Khan Meyer, Valerie Ribao, Malu Stanich and Morgan Wynne traveled to Japan and participated in a cultural and academic exchange with the Nagaoka Institute of Design. Students from both institutions collaborated and presented design proposals during an intensive two-week workshop that took place in both Nagaoka and Honolulu. The exchange was rooted on the recent commemoration of the 70th anniversary of peace between the nations of Japan and the United States and focused on the design of a dual physical memorial for sites in both cities celebrating this friendship and paving the way for future generations to embrace world peace.


NID Professor Seisuke Watanabe explains the sites in Nagaoka

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Students collaborate during design workshop in Japan

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Students present their design work at NID

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Final student presentations at Charlot House in Honolulu

May 17, 2017

Architecture Faculty Senate Letter on Reorganization

Daniel Friedman

Dean and Professor

Last spring, following a joint meeting with the faculty of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Interim Vice Chancellor Michael Bruno, the School of Architecture Faculty Senate sent a letter to IVCAA Bruno stating its position on academic reorganization and related school and university issues. Read the senateʻs letter here.

March 20, 2017

Professor David Rockwood Receives Fulbright Scholar Award

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David Rockwood

Professor David Rockwood has been selected by the presidentially appointed J. William Fulbright Scholarship Board for a Core Fulbright U.S. Scholar award to Vietnam.  Rockwood will undertake teaching and research at Danang University of Science & Technology in Danang, Vietnam during academic year 2017-18.

Rockwood will collaborate with students and lecturers in the Faculty of Architecture and the Faculty of Civil Engineering. The research will follow up from Rockwood’s Fulbright Specialist award in 2014 that focused on the examination of the existing Vietnamese housing stock, and evolution new techniques for constructing affordable and sustainable housing in the country. This year, Rockwood and his Vietnamese colleagues will design, build, and test wall assemblies for public housing with the goal of lowering cost and decreasing heat transfer.

The Fulbright Program, established by Senator J. William Fulbright in 1946, aims to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries. The flagship international educational exchange program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Fulbright alumni have become heads of state, judges, ambassadors, cabinet ministers, CEOs, and university presidents, as well as leading journalists, artists, scientists, and teachers. They include 58 Nobel Laureates, 82 Pulitzer Prize winners, 31 MacArthur Fellows, 16 Presidential Medal of Freedom recipients, and thousands of leaders across the private, public and non-profit sectors.

http://www.cies.org

February 27, 2017

“Flushing Our Future” ASLO 2017 Town Hall Event on Wastewater Treatment

Image water photo by meguro

Wendy Meguro and others

Assistant Professor

This town hall event will connect and engage scholars, other experts, community members, students and decision-makers in the examination of the status of wastewater treatment in Hawaiʻi.

 Hawaiʻi provides a tractable model from which to generate solutions to wastewater management in a world experiencing rapidly changing climate, population growth and ageing infrastructure.  Aging and failing cesspools, increasingly large episodic storms, and sensitive environments combine to create a “perfect storm,” a combination of factors that together result in unprecedented challenges in Hawaiʻi’s wastewater management. This leads to impacts on beaches and aquatic resources, difficulty pinpointing sources of waste contamination, homeowners burdened with upgrade costs, and difficulty navigating the waste treatment regulatory environment.

Multidisciplinary cluster faculty of the University of Hawai'i at Manoa focused on sustainability and community outreach will each provide their impressions and expertise on this issue forming, in aggregate, a thoughtful and reasoned foundation for identifying specific challenges and seeking applied solutions.  The event will include a presentation framing the challenges and current efforts, followed by small group brainstorm and discussion. 

LOCATION
Hawaii Convention Center (Room 306 A)
1801 Kalakaua Ave
Honolulu, HI 96815

February 9, 2017

Building Voices Design Festival Announced

BuildingVoices

April 22, 2017 @ the Hawai’i State Capitol

Official festival website:

https://www.buildingvoices.org/competition/

An ideas + action festival that collects diverse perspectives surrounding
DESIGN as a framework for addressing the challenges and opportunities
facing Hawai’i.

EVENTS include: a symposium, an
international design competition, a
traveling exhibition, a published book
and other design-focused initiatives.

EARTH DAY, SATURDAY APRIL 22, 2017:
a free symposium and exhibit will be open to the public. Other related events will be held throughout the month of April for National Architecture and Landscape Architecture Month.

VENUE: THE HAWAI’I STATE CAPITOL.
See the main website calendar for
other event locations.
We gathered community leaders,
government officials, students, faculty members, and designers to ask what
they felt the most pressing issues and
opportunity areas are for the future of Hawai’i. Five main themes emerged:

1. ECOLOGICAL RESILIENCE
2. RESOURCE INDEPENDENCE
3. HEALTHY CITIZENS
4. COMMUNITY MOBILITY
5. HOUSING FOR ALL

ALL VOICES are invited: community
members, citizen-experts, students,
artists, inventors, designers, architects, landscape architects, planners,
engineers, builders, developers,
and city and state officials.

 

‘UKULELE

NI‘IHAU

KOMOHANA

ʻAʻALA

HOKU

ʻAHI

KAMA‘ĀINA

ʻŌMAʻOMAʻO

AKAMAI

MAKUA

PONI

ʻUPENA

KAPU

LEI

ʻUALA

MAUI

PAʻA

ʻAWAPUHI

HUI

ʻALANI

NAHELE

ʻUMEKE

AUPUNI

MAIʻA

MAKANI

MAHINA

HO‘OKIPA

LOKO IʻA

KEIKI

HAOLE

IKI

KOHOLĀ

KAUPOKU

MAU LOA

‘ONO

HĀLAU

MALIHINI

HO‘OPONO

PŌHAKU

HO‘OLOHE

HONU

KĀNE

ʻILI

MOʻOLELO

KANAKA

WAIWAI

PAU

PIKO

NALU

ʻAWA

PALI

ʻŌLELO

MAHALO

KAHO‘OLAWE

MOʻOPUNA

MAUKA

‘OLI

POKO

LOʻI

ʻAʻOLE

HAPA

ʻŌHIʻAʻAI

NIU

ʻAE

HALE

MELEMELE

LĀNA‘I

HAU‘OLI

LOULU

UA

ʻILIʻILI

AHUPUA‘A

KAHUNA

HIKINA

HANA

NUI

KĀLUA

ʻELEʻELE

HEMA

WA‘A

IMU

O‘AHU

‘OHANA

KAUA‘I

POLŪ

LIMU

I MUA

KUMU

UILA

PUKA

KAHAKAI

MAU

MOKU

IʻA

HEIAU

HULA

INOA