SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
UNIVERSITY OF HAWAIʻI AT MĀNOA

September 12, 2016

How Can Japanese And US Designers Cooperate In A Peace Memorial?

Image 091216FlyerWATANABE

Seisuke Watanabe

Professor, Nagaoka Institute of Design

Aloha kakou—

Please join me in welcoming our esteemed colleague Professor Seisuke Watanabe to our podium on Monday, September 12, 2016. Professor Watanabe’s lecture is entitled, “How can Japanese and U.S. designers cooperate in a peace memorial?”

Professor Watanabe has been an instrumental partner in the creation of our school’s exchange agreement with the Nagaoka Institute of Design, in Nagaoka, Japan. This agreement commemorates the 70th anniversary of peace between the Unites States and Japan.

Nagaoka and Honolulu are sister cities. Nagaoka is the birthplace of Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, who led the December 7, 1941, surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, killing 2,403 Americans. On August 1, 1945, United States forces firebombed Nagaoka, destroying over 80 percent of the city and killing 1,470 Japanese. A few days later—on August 6 and 9, 1945, respectively—the U.S. dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the only wartime use of nuclear weapons in history.

Last April, Professor Judith Stilgenbauer presented a lecture before a standing-room only audience in Nagaoka, the first lecture in our newly-established program of academic exchange. Next spring, undergraduate students from UH-M and NID will jointly participate in a studio exploring the design of peace memorials that commemorate the unique relationship between Nagaoka and Honolulu. Professor Watanabe joins us to open the questions that drive this collaboration.

We hope to see you Monday, 6 p.m., in the auditorium, reception to follow.

Highest regards and mahalo,
Daniel

Links:
HANDOUTPresident Obama's speech.pdf
HANDOUTPeace Summit Declaration.pdf

August 20, 2016

Hawaiian Design Identity

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Please join us for the inaugural event in our 2016-17 Architecture Lecture Series, on Monday, August 29, 2016, 6:00pm, Auditorium.  This presentation aims to present diverse perspectives on the question of Hawaiian design identity.  Other distinguished speakers at the podium include: Robert Iopa, AIA (WCIT); Karen Lee, (Urban Works); and Kūha‘o Zane (Sig Zane Designs).

August 10, 2016

2016-17 LECTURE SERIES

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Monday, August 29
Hawaiian Design Identity

David Kaahaaina, Jr., AIA  (moderator)

Alana Buick & Bers

Karen Lee
Urban Works

Rob Iopa, AIA 
WCIT

Kūha’o Zane
Sig Zane Designs

Monday, September 12
Perspectives on the Architecture of Peace

Seisuke Watanabe
Nagaoka Institute of Design

 

Friday, October 14
Recent work (title TBA)

David Leatherbarrow, PhD
Chair, Graduate Group, University of Pennsylvania School of Design

 

Monday, November 14
Recent Work (title TBA)

Mark Reddington, FAIA
Design partner, LMN Architects, Seattle

 

Monday, January 30
Hawai’i in Design (title TBA)

Healoha Johnston
Curator, Arts of Hawai’I, Honolulu Museum of Art​


Monday, February 27
Design and Public Life (title TBA)

Nancy Levinson
Editor and Executive Director, Places Journal

 

Monday, March 13
Recent Work (title TBA)

Nina Marie Lister, MCIP, RPP, Hon. ASLA
Associate Prof. and Dir., Graduate Program, School of Urban and Regional Planning, Ryerson University​
Principal, PLANDFORM

Monday, April 10
Ethics & Design in the Public Interest (title TBA)

Victoria E. Beach, AIA
Former Vice-Mayor and City Council Member, Carmel, CA 

April 11, 2016

Local Code: 3,659 Proposals About Data, Design, and the Nature of Cities

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Nicholas de Monchaux

Associate Professor of Architecture and Urban Design,
 College of Environmental Design, UC-Berkeley,
 Berkeley, CA

Nicholas de Monchaux is an architect, urban designer, and theorist. He is the author of Spacesuit: Fashioning Apollo (MIT Press, 2011), an architectural and urban history of the Apollo Spacesuit, winner of the Eugene Emme award from the American Astronautical Society and shortlisted for the Art Book Prize. The work of de Monchaux's Oakland-based design practice has been exhibited at the 2010 Biennial of the Americas, the 2012 Venice Architecture Biennale, San Francisco’s SPUR, and SFMOMA.

de Monchaux received his B.A. with distinction in Architecture, from Yale, and his Professional Degree (M.Arch.) from Princeton. Prior to his independent practice, he worked with Michael Hopkins & Partners in London, and Diller, Scofidio + Renfro in New York.

de Monchaux's work has been supported by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, the Hellman Family fund, the Macdowell Colony, the Santa Fe Institute, and the Smithsonian Institution. He has received design awards and citations from Parsons The New School for Design, the International Union of Architects, Pamphlet Architecture, and the Van Alen Institute.

March 28, 2016

Lo-Fab [Locally Fabricated]

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Sierra Bainbridge

Senior Director, MASS Design Group Ltd., Boston

Sierra Bainbridge is the senior director at MASS Design Group. Sierra began work with MASS in 2008 focusing on the landscape architecture, and joined full time in 2009 to finalize design and oversee implementation of the Butaro Hospital, MASS’s first project. Currently Sierra directs the ongoing design and implementation of MASS’s planning and architectural projects and is currently overseeing The Kayanja Center, an academic facility supporting rural health care delivery and research in Uganda, a number of African Conservation Schools in DRC, Tanzania, Zambia, and Rwanda, and the Butaro Hospital Expansion Plan, among others. Those completed include Butaro Hospital, the Umubano Primary School, the Butaro Doctors’ Housing, and the Butaro Ambulatory Cancer Center.

Prior to joining MASS, Sierra worked for four years at James Corner Field Operations, primarily in design and oversight of implementation of Section 1 of the New York City High Line. Sierra has taught graduate level studios at various universities and from 2010-2012, Sierra served as Head of the Architecture Department at the Kigali Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) in Rwanda.  At KIST, Sierra was instrumental in shaping the current curriculum. She is invited to speak regularly, including the keynote address at the Healthcare Design Conference, serving as a Sasaki Distinguished Visiting Critic at the Boston Architectural College, and lecturing at the Carter ‘Lectures In African Studies’ series, the University of Pennsylvania, Harvard University, University of Toronto, and the American Institute of Architects, among others. Select features of Sierra’s work with MASS Design Group include A+U Magazine, Lotus, Mark Magazine, and Detail.

March 14, 2016

Lecture: Our Model of Models
 / Exhibition: My Model of Models

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Kiel Moe, AIA

Associate Professor of Architecture and Energy
, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, 
Cambridge, MA

Kiel Moe is a registered practicing architect and Associate Professor of Architecture & Energy in the Department of Architecture at Harvard University Graduate School of Design. At the GSD, Moe teaches and coordinates core design studios, seminars on Forms of Energy, and lectures on architecture and energy.

His research and pedagogy focuses on an agenda for design and energy that is at once more ecologically and architecturally ambitious. As such, he focuses on both buildings as manifestations of large scale energy systems as well as overlooked and discrete thermal parameters in buildings that yet have great impact on the power and thermodynamic depth of architecture. This research is the basis for his design research and his design practice.

In recognition of his design and research, he was the 2009-10 Gorham P. Stevens Rome Prize Fellow in Architecture as well as the 2012 Barbara and Andrew Senchak Fellow MacDowell Colony. In 2015, he will be a member of the Arctic Circle expedition residency in Svalbard. He received the 2013 Boston Design Biennial award, the 2011 Architecture League of New York Prize, the 2011 AIA National Young Architect award, and numerous design awards for individual projects from the AIA, North American Wood Design Awards, and Boston Society of Architects, amongst others. He is recipient of Junior Faculty research grants at the GSD, the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, the AIA Upjohn grant program, the Boston Society of Architects Architectural Research program, the AIA RFP grant program, the Northeastern University Provost Faculty Development program. In recognition of his pedagogy and teaching, Moe was awarded the 2010 ACSA/AIAS New Faculty Teaching Award.

He is author of multiple books. He recently published a fifth book entitled Insulating Modernism: Isolated and Non-Isolated Thermodynamics in Architecture, Birkhauser, 2014. He is completing a sixth book, a technical manual on The Hierarchy of Energy in Architecture: Emergy Analysis with Ravi S. Srinivasan (2015) and, a seventh, PLOT: The Matter of Urbanization | Central Park and the Empire State Building, with Jane Hutton (2015). He is also author of Convergence: An Architectural Agenda for Energy (2013), Thermally Active Surfaces in Architecture (2010) and Integrated Design in Contemporary Architecture (2008). He was co-editor of Building Systems: Design Technology & Society (2012).

February 22, 2016

Practicing Architectural Education

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Michael Monti, PhD

Executive Director, Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, 
Washington, DC

Mike Monti’s tenure as executive director of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture perfectly embodies a principle noted by Ernest Boyer and Lee Mitgang in Building Community: “The worlds of practice and education depend on each other for their purpose and vitality.” Since joining the ACSA in February 2004, his thoughtful, strategic leadership has transformed the organization into a model of collaboration, transparency, innovation, and rigorous research and scholarship.

Under his guidance, every aspect of the association has grown in quality and value—from media and meetings to membership, publications, and international alliances. He has immeasurably strengthened the role of research in the profession by supporting efforts to collect, analyze, and publish relevant data. In particular, the “ACSA Atlas” has become the go-to resource for information on the state of architecture education by examining its relationship to demographics, higher education, the profession, and the economy. He was also instrumental in securing funding for the first comprehensive history of design education: Architecture School: Three Centuries of Educating Architects in North America (ed. Joan Ockman; MIT Press), published in 2012 on the occasion of ACSA’s 100th anniversary, is a permanent testament to Monti’s administrative, financial, and intellectual leadership.

As it enters its next century, ACSA is positioned as a strategic partner in improving public understanding of the value of architects, supporting and echoing the AIA’s repositioning efforts and working closely with NAAB, NCARB, and AIAS to intertwine programs that advance their shared interests. Monti’s role in forming partnerships with the AIA’s Historic Resources Committee and the Housing Knowledge Community has strengthened the knowledge base of the profession, and his contributions to the Design and Health Leadership Group have resulted in an overwhelming response to the call for evidence-based research on the topic. In addition, his leadership in the formation of the National Academy of Environmental Design is a pivotal step toward public investment in design research and knowledge.

He has deftly steered the ACSA on a path of meaningful change and brought rigor to its thinking, and the effect of his efforts to develop, synthesize, and communicate a wealth of quantitative and qualitative data will be long lasting.

February 8, 2016

WPA 2.0 Creation of 21st Century Public Infrastructure: Beauty, Economics, Politics, Ecology

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Susannah Drake, FASLA, RLA, RA

Principal, DLAND studio Architecture + Landscape Architecture, 
Brooklyn

DLANDstudio is an interdisciplinary design firm founded in 2005 by Susannah C. Drake. Prior to starting an independent practice, Susannah worked for architects and landscape architects in New York, Cape Cod, New Hampshire, Wyoming and San Francisco. Exposure to diverse ecosystems, population densities, and scales of operation enriched her vision of what makes places truly special. 

The firm provides an integrated approach to planning, programming and design. As leader and collaborator on large teams that include architects, artists, landscape architects, planners, and engineers, DLANDstudio helps enrich team consideration of expressions of landscape meaning while maintaining focus on project goals throughout the development process. The firm is committed to creating projects with a strong conceptual basis drawn from an understanding of the place, the client, the program, and appropriate construction techniques. Our goal is to create beautifully designed, ecologically intelligent, and well executed projects that work well at the large scale and are executed in rigorous detail.


Since its establishment, DLANDstudio has grown to include both national and international projects. Recent works include the Gowanus Canal Sponge Park™, a public open space system designed to absorb and remediate stormwater, the Brooklyn Bridge Pop-up Park, a temporary waterfront open space that attracted almost two hundred thousand visitors over thirteen weeks of operation in 2008, and the security for the New York City Police Department headquarters in Lower Manhattan. DLANDstudio’s current international work includes the Raising Malawi Academy for Girls outside of Lilongwe, Malawi and the design of a 1200 acre public park and resort development in Abuja, Nigeria. The firm’s Brooklyn Queens Expressway trench study and Gowanus Canal Sponge Park™ project are the recipients of numerous awards from the American Institute of Architecture and American Society of Landscape Architects.

dlandstudio architecture

 

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